Jumping Worms

Native to East Asia, jumping worm was found in Wisconsin in 2013. Jumping worms feed on soil organic matter, leaf litter and mulch and create very grainy-looking and hard little pellets when they excrete. The ‘changed’ soil resembles large coffee grounds, and has poor structure for plants to grow in. Also, the worms feed on […]

Aphids

Aphids are soft-bodied, sucking insects that are sometimes called plant lice. They feed on plant sap and subsequently excrete a sugary substance (called honeydew) that can attract ants as well as support the growth of a saprophytic fungus called sooty mold. Learn about common aphids found in home gardens in this factsheet.

Serviceberry, Amelanchier spp.

If you’re looking for a small tree with attractive white blossoms in spring and small fruits that can be food for animals or humans, consider one of several species of serviceberry. There are a number of plants in the genus Amalanchier that are graceful trees or shrubs that can provide year-round ornamental interest in the landscape. To learn more, read this article…

Sawflies

Sawflies are a group insects related to wasps that get their common name from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which females use to cut slits in stems or leaves to lay their eggs. The plant-feeding larvae often look like caterpillars or slugs, and many are quite noticeable because they often stay together to feed in groups and quickly cause noticeable defoliation on their hosts. Learn more about sawflies in this article…

Eastern Filbert Blight

Eastern filbert blight is a potentially serious fungal disease found throughout the United States, including Wisconsin. It affects Corylus species, commonly known as hazelnuts or filberts, causing cankers on branches and trunks. Symptoms and management are described in this factsheet.

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) is an invasive planthopper native to China, India, and Vietnam. It was first detected in the U.S. in Pennsylvania in 2014, and due to its highly invasive nature, it appears to be spreading rapidly. SLF has a large host range and potentially could greatly impact the grape, tree fruit, plant nursery and timber industries in the U.S. Learn about what to watch for with this new pest.

Cucumber Mosaic

Cucumber mosaic is a viral disease of worldwide distribution that affects over 1200 plant species. Hosts include a wide range of fruits, vegetables, herbaceous and woody ornamentals, and weeds. This factsheet covers identification and ways to prevent this incurable disease.

Japanese Beetle

The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica, is a significant pest of landscape trees and shrubs, vegetable and fruit crops, and turfgrass in the eastern United States. This factsheet describes the lifecycle of this destructive beetle along with management and control options.

Stinkhorns

Stinkhorns are mushrooms that are found from the tropics to more temperate regions such as Wisconsin. They can suddenly appear in mulch, lawns, and areas with bare soil. These visually-shocking fungi get their common name from their characteristic, unpleasant odor. Stinkhorns do not cause plant disease, and can actually be beneficial, as described in this factsheet.

Boxelder Bug, Boisea trivittatus

Those pesky black and red bugs all over the place! Boxelder bugs are very noticeable in the fall when they congregate before overwintering in buildings. As long as they remain cold, they are inactive, but when warmed a furnace or sunshine, they become active and may crawl into the rooms. To learn more about this nuisance pest, read this article…

Forsythia, Forsythia spp.

As one of the first shrubs to flower, the showy yellow flowers of forsythia are the ultimate symbol of spring in many places. This tough, early-blooming, medium-sized shrub does well in the urban landscape, but does have some drawbacks. Learn more about forsythia in this article…

Black Knot, Apiosporina morbosa

Unsightly dark-colored lumps on plum trees are not only unattractive, but if there are lots of them, they can disfigure or even kill small trees. These swollen growths are caused by a fungal pathogen that causes the disease known as black knot. To learn more about this disease and how to manage it, read this article…

Support Extension