Shade Trees Disorder: Decline, Dieback, or Early Senescence

Author(s): M.F. Heimann, G.L. Worf “Decline” is a general term that describes the deterioration of a tree’s crown or an overall reduction in vigor. “Dieback” indicates more localized symptoms, with healthy branches adjacent to dead or dying ones. Find out more about tree decline and dieback, how to spot the difference between the two, and […]

Pruning Deciduous Trees

Laura Jull, UW-Madison Horticulture, UW-Extension Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1014 Why prune trees? Pruning is important for a variety of reasons.  Pruning can help control the size of a tree, direct growth, influence flowering or fruiting, or maintain plant health and appearance.  Pruning can also increase the safety of a tree by removing broken, diseased, […]

Pruning Deciduous Shrubs

Laura Jull, UW-Madison Horticulture, UW-Extension Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1015 Why prune shrubs?  Pruning is important for a variety of reasons.  Pruning can help control the size of a shrub, direct growth, influence flowering or fruiting, rejuvenate old, overgrown plants, or maintain plant health and appearance.  Pruning also encourages growth below the pruning cut.  In […]

Plants Not Favored by Deer

If deer visit your property, you’ve likely already experienced the frustration of having landscape plants destroyed overnight. Before planting (or replanting), check out this list of trees, shrubs, flowers, herbs, and grasses that deer tend to avoid.

Hummingbirds in the Garden

Hummingbirds are a large group of tiny birds with iridescent feathers, looking like sparkling jewels zipping among the flowers. These nectar-feeding birds utilize a wide range of plants to supply their enormous metabolic needs. Learn more about this fascinating group of birds and how to encourage ruby-throated hummingbirds, the Midwest’s only hummingbird species, in your garden in this article…

Webworms

R. Chris Williamson, UW-Extension Turf and Ornamental Specialist Revised:  4/25/2004 Item number:  XHT1066 The term webworm is used to describe several insects whose caterpillars use silk to join plant parts together to form protective nests.  Two common insects that create nests in fruit and woody ornamental trees are the eastern tent caterpillar and the fall […]

Gray Mold (Botrytis Blight)

Jeffory Schraufnagel*, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/11/2010 Item number:  XHT1122 What is gray mold?  Gray mold (or Botrytis blight) is a common and often serious fungal disease that can affect plants of all kinds.  Gray mold is a particularly serious problem on flowering plants and those plants grown in […]

Deciduous Trees Disorder: Miscellaneous Causes of Decline

Author(s): G.L. Worf., J.E. Kuntz Many problems and disorders can lead to tree decline. This fact sheet explores sun scald, girdling roots, mower injury, previous defoliation, graft incompatibility, twine and tree wrap injury, and gas leaks as common causes of tree decline and death (4 pages). Click on this link to view the PDF of […]

Jumping Worms

Native to East Asia, jumping worm was found in Wisconsin in 2013. Jumping worms feed on soil organic matter, leaf litter and mulch and create very grainy-looking and hard little pellets when they excrete. The ‘changed’ soil resembles large coffee grounds, and has poor structure for plants to grow in. Also, the worms feed on […]

Wood Mulch and Tree Health

Jane Cummings-Carlson and John Kyhl, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; Gina Foreman and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1121 What are the benefits of wood mulch? Wood mulch is typically available as chipped wood, or shredded or chunked bark, and can contribute to tree health in many ways.  When high quality, […]

Tar Spot of Trees and Shrubs

Authors: Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Last Revised: 12/17/2018 X-number: XHT1126 What is tar spot?   Tar spot is a common, visually distinctive and primarily cosmetic fungal leaf spot disease.  Tar spot can affect many species of maple, including (but not limited to) silver maple, sugar maple and Norway maple.  Boxelder (also known as ash-leaved maple), willow, holly and […]

Support Extension