Star Magnolia, Magnolia stellata

If you want a small tree or large shrub with large, showy white or pink flowers in early spring, star magnolia is a great choice. There are several cultivars of this deciduous ornamental with bold, glossy foliage and interesting winter architecture, making it a good specimen plant at any time of the year. Read more about Magnolia stellata in this article…

River Birch, Betula nigra

Betula nigra is a tall native tree that makes a great ornamental for large spaces because of its graceful form and attractive bark. It is one of the most culturally adaptable and heat tolerant of the birches, thriving in moist soil, but is somewhat drought tolerant once established. To learn more about river birch, read this article…

Is My Ash Tree Worth Treating for Emerald Ash Borer?

When should I consider treating my ash tree for EAB? This factsheet addresses some of the most frequently asked questions regarding the treatment of ash trees for emerald ash borer (EAB), and the removal and disposal of infested trees.

Daphne xburkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’

If you want a medium-sized shrub with fragrant flowers in spring and attractive, variegated foliage the rest of the growing season, consider ‘Carol Mackie’ daphne. This mound-shaped shrub is covered in intoxicatingly scented flowers in late spring. To learn more about this  low-maintenance plant, read this article…

Mighty Mites

Did you know that there are mites that eat other mites? Barely visible to the naked eye, these little predators help keep spider mites and other pests in check. Read on to learn more about this fascinating world of tiny predatory mites…

Maple Gall Mites (Eriophyidae)

Have you found little green or red bumps or other weird growths on maple leaves and wondered what caused that? Inside each bump are tiny eriophyid mites, feeding on the developing gall tissue. If you want to learn more about these mites and what to do about this problem, check out this article on maple gall mites…

Three Flowered Maple, Acer triflorum

Are you looking for a small tree with great fall color and winter interest? The Asian maple Acer triflorum fits the bill. Learn more about this attractive species in this article…

Fall Webworm, Hyphantrea cunea

If you have noticed large silken webs on the ends of branches on trees this time of year, you are looking at the nests of fall webworm. This native insect feeds on many different shade trees and deciduous ornamental trees. To learn more about fall webworm, read this article…

Mistletoe

Hanging high in trees in warmer climates, mistletoe is a plant that has a long history of myth and tradition dating back to ancient times. Despite the fact these plants cannot tolerate the cold winters of the Midwest, most people are familiar with mistletoe as a holiday decoration. But there are many other types of mistletoe – and many species that are much more spectacular when in bloom. To find out more about this interesting group of parasitic plants, read this article…

'Tiger Eyes' Staghorn Sumac, Rhus typhina

Looking for a striking foliage plant? Tiger Eyes™, introduced in 2004, offers a long season of interest with deeply-cut, almost lacy leaves that start yellow and turn orange in fall. This medium-sized, slow-spreading shrub is a big departure from the typical staghorn sumac. Learn more about Tiger Eyes™ sumac in this article…

Amur Cherry, Prunus maackii

In cold climates with long winters, it’s nice to incorporate plants with winter interest in the landscape. Amur cherry is a small tree from the Far East that has cinnamon-brown exfoliating bark that is most prominent in winter, when the leaves have fallen. To learn more about this attractive, underused tree hardy to zone 2, read this article…

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