San José Scale

This factsheet describes the symptoms, life cycle, monitoring methods and control of San José scale (Diaspidiotus perniciosus). This fruit tree pest can be found in most fruit growing regions of the United States. In well-managed orchards, populations of San José scale are generally too low to cause economic damage. In poorly managed orchards however, San José scale can get established and be difficult and expensive to control.

Serviceberry, Amelanchier spp.

If you’re looking for a small tree with attractive white blossoms in spring and small fruits that can be food for animals or humans, consider one of several species of serviceberry. There are a number of plants in the genus Amalanchier that are graceful trees or shrubs that can provide year-round ornamental interest in the landscape. To learn more, read this article…

Sawflies

Sawflies are a group insects related to wasps that get their common name from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, which females use to cut slits in stems or leaves to lay their eggs. The plant-feeding larvae often look like caterpillars or slugs, and many are quite noticeable because they often stay together to feed in groups and quickly cause noticeable defoliation on their hosts. Learn more about sawflies in this article…

Eastern Filbert Blight

Eastern filbert blight is a potentially serious fungal disease found throughout the United States, including Wisconsin. It affects Corylus species, commonly known as hazelnuts or filberts, causing cankers on branches and trunks. Symptoms and management are described in this factsheet.

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) is an invasive planthopper native to China, India, and Vietnam. It was first detected in the U.S. in Pennsylvania in 2014, and due to its highly invasive nature, it appears to be spreading rapidly. SLF has a large host range and potentially could greatly impact the grape, tree fruit, plant nursery and timber industries in the U.S. Learn about what to watch for with this new pest.

Cucumber Mosaic

Cucumber mosaic is a viral disease of worldwide distribution that affects over 1200 plant species. Hosts include a wide range of fruits, vegetables, herbaceous and woody ornamentals, and weeds. This factsheet covers identification and ways to prevent this incurable disease.

Deciduous Tree and Shrub Disorder: Skeletonizing by Rose Chafer

Author(s): R.C. Williamson, C.F. Koval Skeletonizing of the leaves of roses, raspberries, grapes, fruit trees, and many other cultivated trees and shrubs may be caused by the adult rose chafer, Macrodactylus subspinosus (Fabricius). Adult beetles are attracted to flower blossoms, particularly roses and peonies. Damage occurs in June and tends to be most severe in […]

Root-Knot Nematode

Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are small, soilborne, worm-like organisms that infect many agricultural and horticultural plants. This publication describes the symptoms, management and control of root-knot nematodes in Wisconsin.

Foliar Nematodes

Foliar nematodes are microscopic worm-like organisms in the genus Aphelenchoides. They live in and on the leaves (and other above-ground plants parts) of over 450 plant species in more than 75 plant families. They are commonly found on hostas, but can affect other herbaceous ornamentals. Learn what to look for and how to manage foliar nematodes in this factsheet.

Controlling Deer Damage in Wisconsin

Scott Craven, Scott Hygnstrom, Philip Peterson Revised:  1/24/2001 Item number:  G3083 Illustrates numerous methods for protecting crops and other property from deer. Offers designs for deer fences and other constructions, along with a list of repellents and scare devices (8 pages). Download Article

Southern Blight

Authors: Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Last Revised: 01/03/2019 X-number: XHT1042   What is Southern blight?  Southern blight is a lethal fungal disease that is most common in the tropics and subtropics.  This disease causes damage in the southern U.S. and can even cause problems in temperate locations like Wisconsin during periods of warm, moist […]

Crown Gall

Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/5/2005 Item number:  XHT1037 What is a crown gall?  Crown gall is the most widely distributed bacterial disease of plants in the world, affecting over 100 species of fruit crops, and woody and herbaceous ornamentals, including rose, euonymus, lilac, poplar, viburnum, willow, apple, pear, brambles, stone […]

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