Aphids, in-depth

Aphids may be viewed as just another pest for gardeners to try to eliminate, but they’re really fascinating insects, with bizarre lifestyles and eating habits and they’re also dinner for lots of other insects. Forming colonies covering the leaves and stems of plants, these small sap-sucking creatures reproduce incredibly fast and a few also transmit plant diseases. Learn more about this large group of insects and how to manage them in the garden in this article…

Chlorosis

Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology, UW-Extension Revised:  1/8/2012 Item number:  XHT1002 What is chlorosis?  Chlorosis is a common nutritional disorder of many woody ornamentals in Wisconsin, particularly in the southern and eastern parts of the state.  Pin oaks are most commonly affected by chlorosis, although many other trees and shrubs (e.g., white oak, red maple, […]

Home Landscape Insecticides

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1096 Recently, several commonly-used insecticides for the control of insects on woody landscape plants have been taken off the market.  As a result, it’s becoming ever more challenging for home gardeners to find suitable insecticide products at garden centers, discount stores, and hardware stores.  […]

Degree Days for Common Landscape Insect Pests

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1088 Ash Borer 1st instar larvae = 275-500 DD50 Ash Plantbug Nymphs = 100-200 DD50 Birch Leafminer 1st generation larvae = 275-500 DD50 Black Vine Weevil 1st generation adults = 400-600 DD50 2nd generation adults = 900-1000 DD50 Bronze Birch Borer Larvae = 400-500 […]

Degree Day Calculation

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  8/6/2012 Item number:  XHT1086 Indicator plants are not always suitable for the timing of pest management practices.  You may not have the critical indicator plant  nearby to time local activities, or there may not be a good indicator plant for a particular pest’s crucial life stage.  Another […]

Phenology

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  5/17/2012 Item number:  XHT1085 The word phenology is derived from the Greek word phaino meaning “to show” or “to appear”.  Phenology is a branch of science that studies the relationships between periodic biological events—usually the life cycles of plants and animals—and environmental changes.  Natural events such as […]

Degree Days for Common Fruit & Vegetable Insect Pests

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  8/6/2012 Item number:  XHT1087 Common Vegetable Insects that can be monitored using degree days or indicator plants Cabbage Maggot Base temperature = 43°F 300, 1476, 2652 DD43 for 1st, 2nd, & 3rd generations flies 1st generation eggs are laid when the common lilac is in full bloom […]

Twospotted Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae

From apples to zucchini – no matter what types of plants you grow – it’s likely something spider mites will attack. The most common spider mite, the twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), is a general feeder that attacks a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Learn about this the biology of this tiny pest, the type of damage it causes and how to manage it in this article…

Root Rots in the Garden

Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology and Laura Jull, UW-Madison Horticulture Revised:  5/20/2011 Item number:  XHT1072 What is root rot? Root rot is a general term that describes any disease where the pathogen (causal organism) attacks and leads to the deterioration of a plant’s root system.  Most plants are susceptible to root rots, including both woody […]

Scale Insects

Scale insects feed on many plants, but are often overlooked because they are immobile and many types look like small bumps that just might be plant parts blending in with the leaves, twigs and branches. These insects secrete a waxy covering – that gives them their common name – to protect them from the environment and predators. Learn more about this group of inconspicuous and atypical insects in this article…

Fruit Crop Pollination

Author(s): Teryl R. Roper For fruit to develop, pollen must be transferred from the anther to the stigma. Find out which crops require pollen from the flowers of a different cultivar to set fruit, and which can set fruit on their own (3 pages). Download Article

Fertilizing Small Fruits in the Home Garden

Author(s): T.R. Roper Want a bumper crop of berries this year? Learn to determine your lime, organic matter, and fertilizer needs for raspberries, blueberries, grapes, currants, and gooseberries (4 pages). Download Article

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