Fertilizing Small Fruits in the Home Garden

Author(s): T.R. Roper Want a bumper crop of berries this year? Learn to determine your lime, organic matter, and fertilizer needs for raspberries, blueberries, grapes, currants, and gooseberries (4 pages). Download Article

Organic Lawn Fertilization

Increased interest in organic, sustainable gardening, has grown to include a variety of lawn care practices, including use of organic fertilizers derived from natural sources such as plant or animal wastes. As use of organic fertilizers becomes more widespread, understanding ways in which they differ from conventional, inorganic fertilizers is important.

Using Wood Ash in the Home Garden

Authors: Kevin Schoessow, Extension Burnett, Sawyer and Washburn Counties Last Revised: 02/27/2020 X-number: XHT1268   Home gardeners often ask if wood ash can be used as a fertilizer in vegetable gardens and flowerbeds, around landscape trees and shrubs, and on lawns.  Wood ash can be a valuable source of certain nutrients and can also be used to modify […]

Reducing Soil pH

Sherry Combs, formerly of the UW-Madison Soil and Plant Analysis Lab Revised:  10/27/2007 Item number:  XHT1151 Is your soil pH too high?  Probably not, although the popular press urges most gardeners to question whether their garden soil pH is ‘right’.  Only a soil test for pH can indicate whether the pH is ‘right’, and ‘right […]

Jumping Worms

Native to East Asia, jumping worm was found in Wisconsin in 2013. Jumping worms feed on soil organic matter, leaf litter and mulch and create very grainy-looking and hard little pellets when they excrete. The ‘changed’ soil resembles large coffee grounds, and has poor structure for plants to grow in. Also, the worms feed on […]

Stinkhorns

Stinkhorns are mushrooms that are found from the tropics to more temperate regions such as Wisconsin. They can suddenly appear in mulch, lawns, and areas with bare soil. These visually-shocking fungi get their common name from their characteristic, unpleasant odor. Stinkhorns do not cause plant disease, and can actually be beneficial, as described in this factsheet.

Making and Using Compost in the Garden

Making your own compost is an easy, practical, and satisfying way to make use of yard waste and table scraps. With this publication, designed for the home gardener, you’ll be composting like a pro in no time!

Soil Contaminants in Community Gardens

John Folstad, Sharon C. Long, Doug Soldat Revised:  2/17/2011 Item number:  A3905-03 As interest in community and home gardening continues to grow nationwide, an increasing number of gardens are being sited in dense urban areas or on or near former industrial, agricultural, or commercial land. Any of these areas may contain contaminated soil, so it […]

Safely Using Manure in the Garden

Steven Ingham, UW-Madison Food Science Revised:  1/5/2007 Item number:  XHT1143 Many vegetable gardeners swear by the benefits of manure as a fertilizer.  Adding manure to soil improves the soil’s texture and water-holding capacity while providing nutrients needed by growing plants.  Unfortunately, fresh manure can also contain bacteria that can contaminate vegetables and cause human disease.  […]

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