Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy is a perennial woody plant that grows as either a low shrub or a climbing vine. Poison ivy is native to North America and is common in Wisconsin, growing in pastures, roadside ditches, fence rows, wooded forests, beaches and parks. Contact with poison ivy causes skin rashes, blisters and other allergic reactions. Learn identification and control in this factsheet.

Milkweed (Ornamental Plants Toxic to Animals)

To increase monarch populations, people are increasingly planting ornamental types of milkweed and encouraging common milkweed to grow wherever it occurs in uncultivated areas. While milkweed is beneficial to monarch populations, people need to be aware that it is toxic and can be lethal to animals, particularly horses and other equines.

Espalier

Interested in getting higher yields of fruit, want a fruit tree but don’t have much space, or just want an interesting plant as a focal point? Read this article to learn more about the classic technique of espalier…

Amazing Flowers

Everyone has a vision of what a “flower” looks like, but plant flowers are extremely variable and come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and configurations. Take a virtual tour of a dozen weird and wonderful flowers, each from a different plant family, and learn about some of their interesting characteristics, pollinators, or uses. No daisies here…

Hot-Water Seed Treatment for Disease Management

Growing vegetables from seed is common for many home gardeners, but seed can sometimes be contaminated with disease-causing organisms. Learn about hot water seed treatment to reduce pathogens in this guide.

Capers, Capparis spinosa

Most of us have eaten capers at one time or another – those salty, slightly astringent and pungent, pea-sized, dark green things used as a seasoning or garnish in Mediterranean dishes or with lox. But do you know what the plant is that you’re eating? Learn all about what capers are in this article…

Stinkhorns

Stinkhorns are mushrooms that can appear in mulch, lawns, and areas with bare soil. Stinkhorns do not cause plant disease, and can be beneficial, as described in this factsheet.

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