Mighty Mites

Did you know that there are mites that eat other mites? Barely visible to the naked eye, these little predators help keep spider mites and other pests in check. Read on to learn more about this fascinating world of tiny predatory mites…

Shamrocks, Oxalis spp.

Everything’s coming up green – no, not outside in the yard, but in stores as St. Patrick’s Day approaches. You’ve probably seen the displays in the grocery store, florist or even on discount store’s shelves, but do you know anything about those plants they call shamrocks? Learn more about the plants marketed for this holiday…

Purple Heart, Tradescantia pallida

Want to add a splash of purple foliage to your containers and plantings this season? One easy-to-grow plant is Purple Heart. This tender perennial can be used outdoors during the growing season, but makes an easy houseplant in the winter. To learn more about this species, read on…

Sweet Bay, Laurus nobilis

Every year the Herb Society of America features one plant that is used as an herb. In 2009, they focus on Laurus nobilis, a woody plant whose leathery leaves are used as a culinary herb – bay leaf. Although it is not hardy in our area, we can still grow this as a container plant to bring indoors over the winter. If you want to learn more about this interesting herb, read this article…

Split-leaf philodendron, Monstera deliciosa

It’s a tropical plant native to rainforests of Central America that is often grown as a foliage houseplant. With big holes in its leaves, it’s aptly called Swiss cheese plant, but is more commonly known as split-leaf philodendron. Did you know it also has edible fruits? Learn more about Monstera deliciosa in this article…

Bleeding Heart Vine, Clerodendrum thomsoniae

Picture a plant from tropical west Africa that has clusters of inflated white flowers with a red “bleeding heart” emerging from the center. Maybe you’d like to try growing this twining evergreen shrub indoors if you have plenty of light. You can learn more about exotic Clerodendrum thomsoniae in this article…

Pothos, Epipremmum aureum

Pothos is one of the most popular houseplants in North America. Easily propagated and able to grow in relatively low light, this tropical plant is grown for its juvenile foliage. In the tropics the rambling stems can grow up to 65 feet long, but it can be kept much shorter for use as a container plant. To read more about this evergreen root-climber, read this article…

Spider plant, Chlorophytum comosum

Looking for an easy houseplant? Look no further than spider plant. This tough foliage plant tolerates inconsistent watering, has few pest problems, grows well in medium to bright light indoors, and is easy to propagate. It  available in both green and variegated versions. Learn more about this South African native in this article…

Aeonium

Are you looking for a plant to provide both color and architectural interest? Look no further than the succulent Aeonium, a tender perennial used extensively as an ornamental in mild climates. It adapts readily to container culture, so can be grown as a seasonal plant in cold climates or even a houseplant if you have very bright light. Read more about this interesting plant in this article…

Angel’s Trumpet, Brugmansia

With huge, fragrant  flowers hanging from a small tree, angel’s trumpet is a spectacular exotic plant common in the tropics. It can also be grown as a seasonal outdoor plant in the Midwest during the summer, or as a conservatory plant. There are many species and hybrids of Brugmansia although many retailers only offer unnamed plants by flower color. To learn more about this interesting group of tropical trees and how they can be grown in cold climates, read this article…

Mealybugs

If you see fluffy-looking white blobs on your houseplants, you probably have an infestation of mealybugs. These are soft-bodied insects that have a waxy material covering their bodies.  There are many different species of mealybugs that commonly occur on a wide variety of plants. To learn more about these pests and how to control them, read this article…

Clivia

With glossy leaves and clusters of brilliant orange flowers in late winter, this exotic tender perennial makes a nice houseplant. Native to souther Africa, it is now used as a landscape plant in mild climates around the world. To learn more about kaffir lily or clivia, read this article…

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