Bacterial Wilt of Cucurbits

What is bacterial wilt? Bacterial wilt is a common and destructive disease that affects cucurbits (i.e., plants in the cucumber family), including economically important crops such as melon (Cucumis melo), cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and, to a lesser extent, squash and pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.). This disease is distributed throughout the United States; and can be found anywhere that cucurbits are grown.

Tomato Spotted Wilt of Potato

Tomato spotted wilt is a common viral disease of worldwide distribution that can affect over 1000 plant species. Economically important hosts include a wide range of vegetables, fruits, field crops, and ornamentals. Many weeds are also potential hosts.

Squash Bug

Squash bugs are an emerging problem in Wisconsin. In recent years, these insects have become more prevalent, causing damage to vine crops in home gardens and commercial fields alike. Squash bugs feed on all vine crops, but pumpkins and squash are their preferred hosts. This factsheet covers identification, life cycle, management and more.

Vegetable Varieties for Containers

Growing plants in containers (referred to as container gardening) is an easy way to grow and maintain vegetables. Find suggested varieties suitable for container gardening here.

Home Vegetable Garden Fungicides

Diseases of vegetable plants can pose a challenge for the home gardener. While cultural methods are the preferred options for disease management in home vegetable gardens, if diseases become problematic, fungicide treatments are also an option. This guide will help identify some of the common, and most suitable, fungicides.

The Basics of Micro Irrigation

Micro irrigation has numerous advantages over sprinkler irrigation and can be used in greenhouses, orchards, vineyards, fields, lawns, and gardens. Learn about the components that comprise a micro irrigation system along with the benefits (reduced water usage, reduced potential for foliar diseases, reduced energy costs, etc.) and drawbacks these lower pressure systems provide.

Rhubarb, Rheum rhabarbarum

Rhubarb is the first “fruit” of the season – used as a fruit, but grows like a vegetable. With huge leaves on long red to green petioles it can also make a dramatic statement in the garden. This old fashioned perennial is very easy to grow, coming back bigger year after year with little care. To learn more about rhubarb, read this article…

Aphids

Aphids are soft-bodied, sucking insects that are sometimes called plant lice. They feed on plant sap and subsequently excrete a sugary substance (called honeydew) that can attract ants as well as support the growth of a saprophytic fungus called sooty mold. Learn about common aphids found in home gardens in this factsheet.

Grow Your Own Salad Greens

Nothing tastes quite like a salad fresh from your own garden. Lettuce, and many other salad greens, are very easy to grow, and there are many more types available to grow yourself than you can typically find at the grocery store. Learn more about the variety of salad greens that are easily grown in a home garden or container in this article…

Hot-Water Seed Treatment for Disease Management

Growing vegetables from seed is a common practice for many home gardeners. Unfortunately, vegetable seed can sometimes be contaminated with disease-causing organisms, particularly disease-causing bacteria. Learn how to use hot water treatment to reduce pathogens that may be carried on seeds in this guide.

Bacterial Spot of Tomato

Bacterial spot of tomato is a potentially devastating disease that, in severe cases, can lead to unmarketable fruit and even plant death. Bacterial spot can occur wherever tomatoes are grown, but is found most frequently in warm, wet climates, as well as in greenhouses. Symptoms and management are covered in this factsheet.

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