Field Pennycress, Thlaspi arvense

There are many weedy plants in the mustard family. It would be easy to overlook field pennycress early in the season, but once the distinctive seed pods develop with a bottle-brush-like appearance, and especially once they start to dry, this plant becomes much more noticeable. Learn more about this introduced weed by reading this article…

Dandelion, Taraxacum officinale

Those cheerful yellow flowers are everywhere in spring. Dandelion is a European species that has made itself at home throughout North America. A menace to gardeners and homeowners looking for a lush, green lawn, this plant can also be cultivated or foraged as food. You can find out more about this ubiquitous weed in this article…

Outdoor Hazards in Wisconsin: A Guide to Insects, Plants, and Wildlife

Scott R. Craven, Phillip J. Pellitteri, Mark J. Renz Revised:  1/15/2010 Item number:  G3564 Wisconsin’s bountiful natural resources make it an ideal place for outdoor recreation. Most plants and creatures you encounter won’t hurt you, but timber rattlesnakes, yellow jackets, wild parsnip, and others can be troublesome. This guide will help you recognize, avoid, and […]

Invasive Phragmites

Invasive phragmites, or common reed. is a tall, perennial grass that aggressively colonizes and forms dense stands in freshwater wetlands. Learn how to identify and control this invasive threat to Wisconsin’s wetlands in this factsheet.

Japanese Knotweed:

Japanese Knotweed, which is native to Asia, has become an invasive plant in Wisconsin. This brochure describes the plant and gives recommendations for control.

Invasive Exotic Shrub Honeysuckles

Includes history, distribution, habitat, similar species, threats, identification and impact, of the shrub honeysuckles that are invasive in the Midwest. Photos and discussion of control strategies are also included.

Purple Loosestrife

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is a fast-spreading, tall Eurasian plant that grows primarily in wetlands and ditches, but can invade home gardens. This factsheet covers identification and control of this attractive, yet invasive, plant.

Dodder

Jennifer Clifford, Amilcar Sanchez, Trenton Stanger, and Brian Hudelson,UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  10/21/2006 Item number:  XHT1156 What is dodder?  Dodder is the name of several species of parasitic plants that are widely distributed in North America and Europe.  Plants parasitized by dodder include alfalfa, carrots, onions, potatoes, cranberries, a variety of herbaceous and woody ornamentals, […]

Identifying grasses in Wisconsin

R.C. Newman Revised:  5/11/2010 Item number:  A1827 Click here to view this 12-page publication that help you identify the 30 most common grass species in Wisconsin turf. Download Article

Common Weed Seedlings of the North Central States

This detailed, illustrated guide will help you identify 54 of the most common problem weed species in the north central region of the United States. It is divided into two main sections: grass and grass-like weeds and broadleaf weeds.

Herbicide Damage

Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/11/2010 Item number:  XHT1004 What is herbicide damage?  Herbicide damage is any adverse, undesired effect on a plant that is caused by exposure of that plant to a pesticide designed for weed control (i.e., a herbicide).  Any plant can be subject to this problem.   What does herbicide damage […]

Dame’s Rocket

Dame’s rocket is a Eurasian biennial belonging to the mustard family. It was introduced to North America in the 1600’s and has naturalized itself in moist, wooded areas, but can also invade open areas. Learn how to identify and control this invasive plant in this factsheet.

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