Garden Spiders

Creepy, crawly critters abound at Halloween and they’re also common in gardens year round. Spiders are good guys to gardeners, since they feed on other insects. There are just a few main groups of spiders that are commonly found in gardens. To learn more about these fascinating arthropods, read this article…

Scales

Karen Delahaut, formerly UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1130 Scales are probably one of the most difficult insects to control because of their protective covering.  There are many species of scales, but they can all be categorized as either soft or armored.  Soft scales are tropical insects and are economically more […]

Spittlebugs

Just what are all those little white blobs you’ve seen on various plant stems and leaves? Those batches of bubbles are created by the immature stage of insects called spittlebugs, and their foam helps protect them from predators, extreme temperatures and dessication. To find out more about these fascinating creatures, read this article…

Winter Salt Injury and Salt-tolerant Landscape Plants

Laura Jull, UW-Extension Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  A3877 This publication focuses on recognizing and preventing plant damage caused by deicing salts, evaluates the pros and cons of alternatives to rock salt, and provides an extensive list of salt-tolerant plants. Download Article

Edema

Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  2/17/2012 Item number:  XHT1116 What is edema?  Edema (or oedema) is a physiological disorder that frequently occurs in houseplants, greenhouse plants, and other plants sheltered under plastic.  This disorder also affects field-grown vegetable crops under certain environmental conditions.  Edema is often a cosmetic problem, but in […]

Cyclamen and Broad Mites

Phil Pellitteri, UW Insect Diagnostic Lab Revised:  5/7/2010 Item number:  XHT1038 Cyclamen and broad mites are extremely small (0.3 mm long) and can be found infesting bedding plants and perennials in the greenhouse and in the garden. Broad mites commonly infest African violet, ageratum, azalea, begonia, dahlia, larkspur, gerbera, gloxinia, ivy, jasmine, impatiens, lantana, marigold, […]

Twospotted Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae

From apples to zucchini – no matter what types of plants you grow – it’s likely something spider mites will attack. The most common spider mite, the twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), is a general feeder that attacks a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Learn about this the biology of this tiny pest, the type of damage it causes and how to manage it in this article…

Root Rots in the Garden

Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology and Laura Jull, UW-Madison Horticulture Revised:  5/20/2011 Item number:  XHT1072 What is root rot? Root rot is a general term that describes any disease where the pathogen (causal organism) attacks and leads to the deterioration of a plant’s root system.  Most plants are susceptible to root rots, including both woody […]

Scale Insects

Scale insects feed on many plants, but are often overlooked because they are immobile and many types look like small bumps that just might be plant parts blending in with the leaves, twigs and branches. These insects secrete a waxy covering – that gives them their common name – to protect them from the environment and predators. Learn more about this group of inconspicuous and atypical insects in this article…

Volutella Blight

Gina Muscato and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1191 What is Volutella blight?  Volutella blight is a common and potentially lethal disease of Japanese pachysandra (Pachysandra terminalis), an evergreen, semi-woody groundcover that is grown in shade gardens throughout hardiness zones 4 and 5 in Wisconsin.  Volutella blight can severely limit the […]

Seed Starting

Starting your garden from seeds might be easier than you think. Check out this article to get practical tips on starting your plants from seeds.

Pollinators

Christy Stewart, UW Horticulture and USDA-ARS Revised:  12/11/2012 Item number:  XHT1213 Why are pollinators important?  Approximately three quarters of the world’s major food crops require or benefit from animal pollination.  This includes many fruits and vegetables such as strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, currants, plums, apples, sweet cherries, pears, watermelons, cantaloupes, cucumbers, squashes, and tomatoes.  Pollinators also […]

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