Fungus Gnats and Shore Flies in Greenhouses

Fungus gnats are considered a cosmetic problem in most situations, but larval feeding on plant roots has been associated with root rots in greenhouse settings. Shore flies (Scatella stagnalis) are another nuisance insect and are often confused with fungus gnats in the greenhouse.

White Mold

Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  4/25/2004 Item number:  XHT1115 What is white mold?  White mold is a serious, and often lethal, fungal disease that affects over 374 types of plants in many plant families.  It causes severe damage in commercial snap, kidney and lima bean production, as well as commercial sunflower […]

Crown Gall

Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/5/2005 Item number:  XHT1037 What is a crown gall?  Crown gall is the most widely distributed bacterial disease of plants in the world, affecting over 100 species of fruit crops, and woody and herbaceous ornamentals, including rose, euonymus, lilac, poplar, viburnum, willow, apple, pear, brambles, stone […]

Bird’s Nest Fungi

Amy Gibbs* and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/31/2005 Item number:  XHT1105 What are bird’s nest fungi?  Bird’s nest fungi are a group of organisms named for their resemblance to miniature bird’s nests.  These fungi can be found all over the world, growing and reproducing on decomposing organic matter.  In temperate regions, bird’s nest […]

Mealybugs

Karen Delahaut, formerly UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  4/26/2004 Item number:  XHT1129 Mealybugs are slow-moving, small, oval insects that are covered with a white, cottony wax.  They are tropical insects that are typically only found on perennial foliage plants, and rarely on flowering or bedding plants.  They can infest all plant parts including the […]

Whiteflies

Karen Delahaut, formerly UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  4/26/2004 Item number:  XHT1127 Whiteflies are not true flies although they look fly-like.  They actually belong to the same order of insects as scales, aphids, and mealybugs: the order Homoptera.  There are several species of whiteflies that can infest greenhouses including the greenhouse (Trialeurodes vaporariorum), sweet […]

Wireworms

Authors: David Lowenstein and Russell Groves, UW-Madison Entomology Last Revised: 05/22/2020 X-number: XHT1045 Wireworms are the larvae of several species of click beetles (Family Elateridae).  These beetles flip into the air with an audible click when turned on their backs.  Wireworms feed primarily on grasses (including grass crops such as corn) but have a broad host range that […]

Field Ants

Phil Pellitteri Revised:  1/25/2011 Item number:  XHT1204 One of the most common ants in Wisconsin is the field ant (Formica spp.).  This ant is noted for producing large mounds that can ruin the aesthetics of home lawns, make lawn mowing difficult, and interfere with the growth of herbaceous and woody ornamentals. Appearance:  Field ants are […]

Purple Loosestrife

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is a fast-spreading, tall Eurasian plant that grows primarily in wetlands and ditches, but can invade home gardens. This factsheet covers identification and control of this attractive, yet invasive, plant.

Extending the Garden Season

Cold frames and hot beds, hoop houses, cloches, and floating row covers allow gardeners to grow plants earlier in spring and later in fall. Although these structures are used primarily for growing vegetables, they may be used for growing ornamentals, including flowering plants, as well.

Rain Barrels

Mike Maddox, State Master Gardener Program Manager & Darren Lochner, Formerly of the UW-Extension Lower Chippewa River Basin Revised:  2/5/2008 Item number:  XHT1157 What is a rain barrel?  A rain barrel can be any large container designed to collect rain water.  Typically, rain barrels are placed at the bottom of downspouts in order to collect […]

Cicada Killer Wasps

Phil Pellitteri, UW Insect Diagnostic Lab Revised:  1/4/2011 Item number:  XHT1198 Cicada killer wasps have become very common in the southern half of Wisconsin.  These solitary wasps are up to 1½ inches long, and their black and yellow coloring makes them look like giant yellow jackets. Life Cycle:  Adult cicada killer wasps appear from mid-July […]

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