Home Fruit Cultivars of Northern Wisconsin

Brian R. Smith, Teryl R. Roper Revised:  7/5/2010 Item number:  A2488 Find out which fruit cultivars are recommended for your area of Northern Wisconsin. Describes flavor, ripening date, winter hardiness, and more. This 16-page fact sheet covers the following: – tree fruits (apples, pears, crabapples)– stone fruits (apricots, tart cherries, plums)– small fruits (strawberries, raspberries, […]

Home Fruit Cultivars for Southern Wisconsin

Find out which fruit cultivars are recommended for Northern Wisconsin. This publication describes flavor, ripening date, winter hardiness, and more. It includes tree fruits (apples, pears, crabapples), stone fruits (apricots, tart cherries, plums), and small fruits (strawberries, raspberries, currants, elderberries, gooseberries, juneberries or serviceberries, grapes, blueberries, lingonberries).

Growing Grapes in Wisconsin

Teryl R. Roper, Daniel L. Mahr, Patricia S. McManus Revised:  7/5/2010 Item number:  A1656 This award-winning manual offers detailed instructions on how to successfully grow grapes in Wisconsin. Covers selecting the best cultivars for your growing conditions, illustrates a variety of trellis designs and proper pruning techniques, and suggests ways to limit or prevent damage […]

Growing Strawberries in Wisconsin

Brian R. Smith, Daniel L. Mahr, Patricia S. McManus, Teryl R. Roper Revised:  7/5/2010 Item number:  A1597 Strawberries are the most widely grown small fruit crop in Wisconsin. Learn about the growth and fruiting habits of strawberries and how to raise and harvest them successfully. Download Article

Growing Raspberries in Wisconsin

Brian R. Smith, Daniel L. Mahr, Patricia S. McManus, Teryl R. Roper Revised:  7/5/2010 Item number:  A1610 A variety of raspberries—black, purple, and yellow as well as red—can thrive throughout Wisconsin. Describes how to select and raise them, and how to protect them from diseases and pests. Download Article

Growing Currants, Gooseberries, and Elderberries in Wisconsin

Teryl R. Roper, Daniel L. Mahr, Patricia S. McManus Revised:  7/5/2010 Item number:  A1960 Currants, elderberries, and gooseberries are all native to Wisconsin woodlands, fence rows, and fields, often harvested from the wild and are prized for making jams, jellies, pies, and juice. These crops are generally hardy enough to be grown in all areas […]

Plants Not Favored by Deer

If deer visit your property, you’ve likely already experienced the frustration of having landscape plants destroyed overnight. Before planting (or replanting), check out this list of trees, shrubs, flowers, herbs, and grasses that deer tend to avoid.

Hardiness Maps

Some plants can survive colder winter temperatures than others. Zone of cold hardiness refers to the plant’s ability to survive the winter. It plays a key factor in selecting landscape plants for the region. USDA has classified the entire United States into 13 plant hardiness zones based on their average, annual minimum temperature during 30 […]

Growing Blueberries in Containers

The blueberry is a wonderful fruit rich in vitamin C, dietary fiber, and vitamin E. Due to its popularity, there is a growing interest among gardeners to plant blueberries in backyard gardens.

Kiwifruit, Actinidia spp.

What’s brown and fuzzy all over and green inside? Well, the kiwifruit, of course. This Chinese fruit was popularized when it was imported into New Zealand, renamed kiwifruit instead of Chinese gooseberry, and developed as an export crop. Today this fruit crop is grown in many places worldwide, but there is more than just the kind found at the grocery store. To learn more about kiwifruit, read this article…

Rhubarb, Rheum rhabarbarum

Rhubarb is the first “fruit” of the season – used as a fruit, but grows like a vegetable. With huge leaves on long red to green petioles it can also make a dramatic statement in the garden. This old fashioned perennial is very easy to grow, coming back bigger year after year with little care. To learn more about rhubarb, read this article…

Serviceberry, Amelanchier spp.

If you’re looking for a small tree with attractive white blossoms in spring and small fruits that can be food for animals or humans, consider one of several species of serviceberry. There are a number of plants in the genus Amalanchier that are graceful trees or shrubs that can provide year-round ornamental interest in the landscape. To learn more, read this article…

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