Degree Day Calculation

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  8/6/2012 Item number:  XHT1086 Indicator plants are not always suitable for the timing of pest management practices.  You may not have the critical indicator plant  nearby to time local activities, or there may not be a good indicator plant for a particular pest’s crucial life stage.  Another […]

Phenology

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  5/17/2012 Item number:  XHT1085 The word phenology is derived from the Greek word phaino meaning “to show” or “to appear”.  Phenology is a branch of science that studies the relationships between periodic biological events—usually the life cycles of plants and animals—and environmental changes.  Natural events such as […]

Degree Days for Common Fruit & Vegetable Insect Pests

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  8/6/2012 Item number:  XHT1087 Common Vegetable Insects that can be monitored using degree days or indicator plants Cabbage Maggot Base temperature = 43°F 300, 1476, 2652 DD43 for 1st, 2nd, & 3rd generations flies 1st generation eggs are laid when the common lilac is in full bloom […]

Twospotted Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae

From apples to zucchini – no matter what types of plants you grow – it’s likely something spider mites will attack. The most common spider mite, the twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), is a general feeder that attacks a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Learn about this the biology of this tiny pest, the type of damage it causes and how to manage it in this article…

Scale Insects

Scale insects feed on many plants, but are often overlooked because they are immobile and many types look like small bumps that just might be plant parts blending in with the leaves, twigs and branches. These insects secrete a waxy covering – that gives them their common name – to protect them from the environment and predators. Learn more about this group of inconspicuous and atypical insects in this article…

Fruit Crop Pollination

Author(s): Teryl R. Roper For fruit to develop, pollen must be transferred from the anther to the stigma. Find out which crops require pollen from the flowers of a different cultivar to set fruit, and which can set fruit on their own (3 pages). Download Article

Home Fruit Insecticides

Authors: PJ Liesch, Annie Deutsch, and Christelle Guédot, UW-Madison Division of Extension Last Revised: 11/13/2019 X-number: XHT1098 Managing fruit crop insect pests can be very challenging.  Pest control involving multiple approaches (referred to as “integrated pest management”) is generally the most effective and safest strategy.  Before taking any management action, make sure to correctly identify any insect pest. […]

Black Stem Borer

Black stem borer (BSB), also known as the alnus ambrosia beetle, is an invasive beetle from Asia that was accidentally introduced into central Europe and North America. BSB has traditionally been considered a serious pest of nursery and landscape trees, but has also been reported as a pest of fruit crops. This factsheet describes the appearance, life cycle, scouting suggestions and control methods of this important pest.

Blueberry Maggot

Blueberry maggot was first detected in Wisconsin in the summer of 2016, and is expected to eventually have a significant impact on blueberry production in Wisconsin. This pest feeds inside blueberry fruit causing it to become soft as it develops. This factsheet describes symptoms, the insect’s lifecycle, monitoring strategies and management methods.

African Fig Fly – Pest Alert

Pest Alert Authors: Janet van Zoeren and Christelle Guédot, UW-Madison Entomology Last Revised: 04/17/2019 X-number: XHT1267 The African fig fly (AFF), Zaprionus indianus, is an invasive vinegar fly closely related to flies in the genus Drosophila [which includes the common vinegar fly (also sometimes called the common fruit fly) and spotted-wing drosophila (SWD)]. AFF is […]

San José Scale

This factsheet describes the symptoms, life cycle, monitoring methods and control of San José scale (Diaspidiotus perniciosus). This fruit tree pest can be found in most fruit growing regions of the United States. In well-managed orchards, populations of San José scale are generally too low to cause economic damage. In poorly managed orchards however, San José scale can get established and be difficult and expensive to control.

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