Apple Pest Management for Home Gardeners

Patricia S. McManus, Daniel L. Mahr, Teryl R. Roper, UW-Extension Revised:  3/17/2011 Item number:  A2179 Home gardens usually contain only a few apple trees, making it feasible to limit pesticide use and still produce a healthy crop of apples. This extensively updated publication outlines the basic principles of pest management. Learn which non-chemical strategies are […]

Apple Maggot

Apple maggot, also commonly known as railway worm, is a significant pest of apples in commercial and backyard orchards in most of the United States and eastern Canada. Although predominantly a pest of apples, apple maggot will also infest pears, apricots, peaches, cherries, crabapples, and rose hips. Learn about the life cycle, damage patterns, and control options to effectively manage apple maggot.

Codling Moth

Codling moth is an insect pest of apple, pear, and walnut crops in Wisconsin. Larval feeding can render fruit unmarketable, potentially causing severe economic loss. Learn how to identify, monitor, and deter this insect pest.

Plum Curculio

Plum curculio, a beetle native to the midwestern United States, is one of the most common and detrimental pests of apple in Wisconsin and can cause significant damage to tree fruit. Along with apple, it attacks pear, quince, and stone fruits such as plum, cherry, peach, and apricot. Learn about the life cycle, damage patterns, and control options to effectively manage plum curculio.

Bagging Apples for Insect and Disease Control

Producing high quality apples in home gardens can be challenging due to damage caused by insects and fungal diseases. Insects and wind-borne fungal spores cause damage when contacting developing fruit. An effective way to produce high-quality fruit organically, without the need for spraying, is placing developing fruit in bags. This factsheet describes the process.

Apple Maggot: Scourge of Home Apple Production

If you have an apple tree in your backyard, you’ve probably found out that apple maggot likes your fruit as much as you do. Learn from UW-Extension Fruit Entomologist Dan Mahr more about this pesky fly and what to do about it in this article…

Spotted Wing Drosophila

Christelle Guédot, UW-Madison Entomology Revised: 01/09/2015 Item number: XHT1237 Spotted wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is an invasive vinegar fly native to Southeast Asia.  It became established in Hawaii during the 1980’s, and was first discovered in the continental United States in California in 2008.  SWD quickly spread throughout the Pacific Northwest and Canada, and […]

Japanese Beetle

The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica, is a significant pest of landscape trees and shrubs, vegetable and fruit crops, and turfgrass in the eastern United States. This factsheet describes the lifecycle of this destructive beetle along with management and control options.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Christelle Guédot, UW-Madison Entomology and Bryan Jensen, UW IPM Program Revised:  3/26/2014 Item number:  XHT1236 Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halymorpha halys, is an exotic, invasive insect native to Asia, including China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan.  BMSB was first confirmed in the United States in 2001 although an unconfirmed sighting was reported in Pennsylvania in […]

Webworms

R. Chris Williamson, UW-Extension Turf and Ornamental Specialist Revised:  4/25/2004 Item number:  XHT1066 The term webworm is used to describe several insects whose caterpillars use silk to join plant parts together to form protective nests.  Two common insects that create nests in fruit and woody ornamental trees are the eastern tent caterpillar and the fall […]

Spongy Moth

P.J. Liesch, UW Entomology and R. Chris Williamson, formerly UW Entomology Revised:  4/1/2022 Item number:  XHT1063 The spongy moth, Lymantria dispar (formerly known as the “gypsy moth”) is native to parts of Europe, Asia, and North Africa. It was inadvertently introduced to North America in New England in 1869 and has since spread westward. Over […]

Aphids

Aphids are soft-bodied, sucking insects that are sometimes called plant lice. They feed on plant sap and subsequently excrete a sugary substance (called honeydew) that can attract ants as well as support the growth of a saprophytic fungus called sooty mold. Learn about common aphids found in home gardens in this factsheet.

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