Nicotiana langsdorffii

Here’s a quick-growing annual that produces lots of pendant chartreuse flowers on branched flower stems at the top of the plant. This makes it a great filler among other herbaceous plants, and the soft green color makes it a perfect buffer between clashing colors. To learn more about Nicotiana langsdorffii, read this article…

Voodoo Lily, Amorphophallus konjac

Voodoo lily is a member of the philodendron family that grows from a tuber. Each tuber produces a single tripartite leaf on a tall, mottled stem. This unusual tropical plant is easy to grow as a seasonal conversation piece and store indoors as a dormant “bulb” during the winter. To learn more about Amorphophallus konjac, read this article…

Laurentia, Isotoma axillaris

Star-shaped flowers of blue, pink or white and ferny foliage makes laurentia a great filler in the flower bed or containers. Although this plant is really a perennial, since it is only hardy to zone 7, most Wisconsin gardeners use it as an annual to add pleasingly fine foliage and soft color in the garden. Read more about laurentia in this article…

Bloody Dock, Rumex sanguineus

Bloody dock is an attractive plant with a network of brightly colored veins on its wide, lance-shaped leaves. This rosette-forming plant is easily grown as an annual or perennial in sun to partial shade and can even be used in a water garden. Find out more about Rumex sanginueus by reading this article…

Scarlet sage, Salvia coccinea

Add some airy sprays of colorful flowers to your gardens with this pretty plant. A perennial in its native habitat from Central America to the southeastern US, scarlet sage is used as an annual or bedding plant in cooler climates. Several cultivars offer bright and pastel blooms on sturdy plants. To learn more about Salvia coccinea, read this article…

Pineapple Mint, Mentha suaveolens ‘Variegata’

Pineapple mint is a fuzzy-leaved plant that can be used as an herb but is more commonly included in the garden as an ornamental for its variegated foliage. Like other mints, it can spread aggressively so needs to be used judiciously. To learn more about this plant, read this article…

Castor Bean, Ricinus communis

Looking to add drama to your landscape? Castor bean is a fast-growing tender perennial with huge leaves that can be used as a seasonal annual  in cooler climates. Chose from a number of varieties of this East African native selected for their ornamental value to make a bold statement in your garden. To learn more about this plant, read this article…

Asparagus fern, Asparagus densiflorus

Asparagus fern is a South African native which is not a fern, but is related to the edible asparagus. The bright green, ferny foliage of this tender perennial makes it a nice houseplant and a good counterpoint to brightly colored flowers in an outdoor seasonal planting. To learn more about this plant, read this article…

Persian Shield, Strobilanthes dyerianus

Looking to add some drama to your garden? Forget flowers and go with iridescent foliage instead for a real show-stopper! Persian shield is a tender perennial grown as an annual in our climate that has been used since Victorian times for its ornamental foliage. To learn more about this exotic, but easily grown plant, read this article…

Golden Shrimp Plant, Pachystachys lutea

Pachystachys lutea is a common landscape ornamental in tropical areas, but you can grow it at home. It’s upright, bright yellow to orange inflorescences contrast nicely with glossy, dark green foliage. To learn more about growing this exotic flowering tropical plant as an outdoor seasonal plant or houseplant, read this article…

Hibiscus schizopetalus

Hibiscus is a quintessential tropical flower, with big, brightly-colored blossoms. But there is a species that has very different, pendant flowers with elaborately dissected and recurved petals. Like other tropical hibiscus, Hibiscus schizopetalus is a tender plant that cannot survive our winters but can be grown as a houseplant. To learn more about this species, read this article…

Prairie Primer

Whether you’re a beginning or an experienced gardener, you’ll appreciate the step-by-step instructions for planting, landscaping, and managing your own prairie plot. The Prairie Primer has more than 50 illustrated descriptions of grasses, wildflowers, and shrubs help you select the best plants for specific sites. Gardeners and prairie enthusiasts alike will find the spiral-bound book convenient to use in the field.

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