Yellow Foxglove, Digitalis grandiflora

Most people are familiar with the purple or white-flowered biennial foxglove. Did you know there is a perennial species with yellow flowers? Lean more about this attractive plant in this article…

Prairie Smoke, Geum triflorum

Geum triflorum is an attractive little prairie plant that easily makes the transition to a perennial border or rock garden to charm you with both its nodding pink flowers and wispy seedheads. Learn more about this interesting native plant in this article…

Early Gems in the Rock Garden

My rock garden is where the first perennials, other than bulbs, bloom in my yard. Read about a few of my favorites that are the first to flower each spring. Several of these don’t need to be restricted to gravelly soils and would be a good addition to a small scale border where they can be appreciated up close. See these cute plants on display in this article…

Lychnis ×arkwrightii 'Vesuvius'

If you’re looking for a plant with purplish leaves in the spring and bright orange flowers, look no further Lychnis ×arkwrightii ‘Vesuvius’. This plant related to rose campion commands attention when it’s in bloom for a few weeks in early- to mid-summer. If you want to know more about this rarely-used perennial, read this article…

Little Bluestem, Schizachyrium scoparium

Native prairie grasses are well adapted to our region and can be a nice addition to the manicured garden as well as in natural settings. Little bluestem, Schizachyrium scoparium, is one with nice blue summer foliage and reddish fall color. Read more about this pretty grass in this article…

Allium senescens ssp. glaucum

Asters, mums and pansies are the standard flowers for fall. But there are other perennials that are just getting going in the fall, too. The late-flowering Allium senescens var. glaucum offers purple-pink flowers at this time of year, and a fun display of swirled blue-green foliage the rest of the growing season. Read more about this ornamental onion in this article…

Blackberry Lily, Belamcanda chinensis or Iris domestica

Flowers that resemble an exotic lily, leaves like an iris, seed clusters that look like a blackberry, and lots of different names – put them all together and what do you get? The former Belamcanda chinensis, of course! For a more extensive explanation of this plant and its new name, read this article…

Japanese Forest Grass, Hakonechloa macra

There are few grasses that perform well in the shade that also have ornamental value. One of the best is Japanese Forest Grass or Hakone Grass, Hakonechloa macra. Learn about this perennial grass in this article…

Yellow Corydalis, Corydalis lutea

Corydalis lutea is a small plant that forms neat mounds of finely cut, delicate-looking light green to blue-green foliage and bright yellow flowers.  If you’re interested in learning more about this pretty perennial, sometimes called yellow corydalis, read this article…

Iris pallida

Iris are blooming (or will be soon), but for most the flowers are the only time we notice the plants. Iris pallida, however, is more known for its attractive foliage than the pale blue flowers. Find out more about this pretty herbaceous perennial plant by reading this article…

Snowdrops, Galanthus spp.

The delicate white flowers and early bloom of these perennial bulbs (even pushing through the snow in cold areas) have given them the common name of snowdrops. Several of the 19 or so species of Galanthus are planted as ornamentals, with most hardy to zone 5, but some to zone 2. Learn more about this hardy group in the amaryllis family in this article…

Nepeta xfaassenii ‘Walker’s Low’

Nepeta xfaassenii ‘Walker’s Low’ was chosen by the Perennial Plant Association as their Plant of the Year 2007. With clouds of blue flowers floating on spires above mounds of blue-grey foliage, this plant is a great addition to both formal and informal gardens. You can find out a lot more about this great perennial by reading this article…

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