Pasque Flower, Pulsatilla vulgaris

Spring has sprung, and the earliest flowers are finally opening. Pasque flower is one of the first to bloom. Learn more about this pretty herbaceous perennial plant in this article…

Snowdrops, Galanthus spp.

The delicate white flowers and early bloom of these perennial bulbs (even pushing through the snow in cold areas) have given them the common name of snowdrops. Several of the 19 or so species of Galanthus are planted as ornamentals, with most hardy to zone 5, but some to zone 2. Learn more about this hardy group in the amaryllis family in this article…

Love-in-a-Mist, Nigella damascena

With unique flowers in blues and white, love-in-a-mist is an old-fashioned, self-seeding annual that is right at home in a cottage garden. This charming plant only blooms for a month or two, but can be seeded in successive plantings for a flowering display for most of the growing season. To learn more about this easy flower, read this article…

Nepeta xfaassenii ‘Walker’s Low’

Nepeta xfaassenii ‘Walker’s Low’ was chosen by the Perennial Plant Association as their Plant of the Year 2007. With clouds of blue flowers floating on spires above mounds of blue-grey foliage, this plant is a great addition to both formal and informal gardens. You can find out a lot more about this great perennial by reading this article…

Lemon Balm, Melissa officinalis

Every year the International Herb Association chooses one plant that is used as an herb to highlight. For 2007 this plant is lemon balm, an attractive plant with a fragrant, lemon-lik odor. Used for tea and medicinal purposes, it is very easy to grow. To learn more about this herb, read this article…

Brown-eyed Susan, Rudbeckia triloba

Commonly called Brown-eyed Susan, Rudbeckia triloba is an herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial with typical coneflowers with yellow rays and brown centers. This rangy plant with masses of small flowers works well in cottage gardens or in wildflower plantings. Learn more about this prairie native in this article…

Aeonium

Are you looking for a plant to provide both color and architectural interest? Look no further than the succulent Aeonium, a tender perennial used extensively as an ornamental in mild climates. It adapts readily to container culture, so can be grown as a seasonal plant in cold climates or even a houseplant if you have very bright light. Read more about this interesting plant in this article…

Silver Sage, Salvia argentea

If you’re looking for a perennial with eye-catching foliage, silver sage is a great choice. This award-winning plant native to southern Europe has large, fuzzy, blue-green leaves that contrast nicely with other plants. Although it will flower, the individual flowers are not particularly impressive, and allowing it to bloom can weaken the plant. To learn more about silver sage, read this article…

Globe Amaranth, Gomphrena globosa

With globular, clover-like flower heads on upright spikes, globe amaranth is an interesting plant to add to the garden. This annual from Central America has stiff, papery bracts that form the showy “flowers” in a range of colors from pink to red to purple, plus white. Learn more about this easy-to-grow plant in this article…

Goatsbeard, Aruncus dioicus

Here’s a low-maintenance plant with spires of foamy white flowers and mounds of dark leaves that turn golden in the fall. This perennial combines well with many other plants in the shade garden. To learn more about goatsbeard, read this article….

Peonies: Long-lived, Voluptuous Beauties

Peonies grow really well in the cold climate of the Midwest, requiring a prolonged winter chill in order to flower. There are numerous cultivars in a range of colors from white to pink and red, with some yellow and orange tones mixed in. These long-lived perennials are also fairly easy to grow if you know how. Get some tips on growing these beauties in this article…

Glory-of-the-Snow, Chionodoxa forbesii

Light blue, upward facing flowers bloom early in the spring – sometimes even poking out of the snow, giving rise to the common name glory-of-the-snow. Chionodoxa forbesii is a great addition to gardens in beds, for naturalizing or mixed in a lawn. This small bulb combines well with other spring bulbs, too. Learn more about glory-of-the-snow in this article…

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