Slime Molds

Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  4/25/2004 Item number:  XHT1091 What is a slime mold?  Slime molds are members of a shape-shifting group of organisms called myxomycetes.  These organisms are found all over the world, even in deserts, high altitudes, and on the edges of snowbanks.  Although they often resemble fungi, slime […]

Home Vegetable Insecticides

Karen Delahaut, UW-Madison Fresh Market Vegetable Program Revised:  3/13/2008 Item number:  XHT1097 Recently, several commonly-used insecticides for the control of insects in home vegetable gardens have been taken off the market.  As a result, it’s becoming ever more challenging for home gardeners to find suitable insecticide products at garden centers, discount stores, and hardware stores.  […]

Bird’s Nest Fungi

Amy Gibbs* and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/31/2005 Item number:  XHT1105 What are bird’s nest fungi?  Bird’s nest fungi are a group of organisms named for their resemblance to miniature bird’s nests.  These fungi can be found all over the world, growing and reproducing on decomposing organic matter.  In temperate regions, bird’s nest […]

Trellising, Staking and Caging – Vertical gardening techniques for vine-type vegetables

Robert Tomesh, horticulture specialist, University of Wisconsin Extension, Cooperative Extension Revised:  3/31/2011 Item number:  A3933-01 Vine-type fruits and vegetables—such as tomatoes, melons, and cucumbers—are some of the most popular produce grown. Various trellising, staking, and caging techniques can be used to enhance yield, minimize disease, and improve harvesting. Find out which techniques will work in […]

Soil Contaminants in Community Gardens

John Folstad, Sharon C. Long, Doug Soldat Revised:  2/17/2011 Item number:  A3905-03 As interest in community and home gardening continues to grow nationwide, an increasing number of gardens are being sited in dense urban areas or on or near former industrial, agricultural, or commercial land. Any of these areas may contain contaminated soil, so it […]

Safely Using Manure in the Garden

Steven Ingham, UW-Madison Food Science Revised:  1/5/2007 Item number:  XHT1143 Many vegetable gardeners swear by the benefits of manure as a fertilizer.  Adding manure to soil improves the soil’s texture and water-holding capacity while providing nutrients needed by growing plants.  Unfortunately, fresh manure can also contain bacteria that can contaminate vegetables and cause human disease.  […]

Extending the Garden Season

Cold frames and hot beds, hoop houses, cloches, and floating row covers allow gardeners to grow plants earlier in spring and later in fall. Although these structures are used primarily for growing vegetables, they may be used for growing ornamentals, including flowering plants, as well.

Rain Barrels

Mike Maddox, State Master Gardener Program Manager & Darren Lochner, Formerly of the UW-Extension Lower Chippewa River Basin Revised:  2/5/2008 Item number:  XHT1157 What is a rain barrel?  A rain barrel can be any large container designed to collect rain water.  Typically, rain barrels are placed at the bottom of downspouts in order to collect […]

Container Gardening

Live in an apartment or condo? You can still raise a garden’s worth of flowers or vegetables in pots and other containers by mastering these methods.

Using Cover Crops and Green Manures in the Home Vegetable Garden

Doug Higgins and Kristin Krokowski, UW-Extension Waukesha County, and Erin Silva, UW-Agronomy Revised:  5/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1209 What are cover crops and green manures?  Cover crops are plants grown in a garden to improve a soil’s physical structure and fertility.  As cover crops grow, they become reservoirs for important plant nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus […]

The Basics of Micro Irrigation

Micro irrigation has numerous advantages over sprinkler irrigation and can be used in greenhouses, orchards, vineyards, fields, lawns, and gardens. Learn about the components that comprise a micro irrigation system along with the benefits (reduced water usage, reduced potential for foliar diseases, reduced energy costs, etc.) and drawbacks these lower pressure systems provide.

Indian Corn

This time of year seasonal decorations made of natural materials, including Indian corn, show up at Farmers Markets and craft shows. Indian or flint corn is one of many types of maize or corn with colored kernels, either of a single or multiple colors. To learn more about these types of corn that have attractively-colored kernels, read this article…

Support Extension