Forsythia, Forsythia spp.

As one of the first shrubs to flower, the showy yellow flowers of forsythia are the ultimate symbol of spring in many places. This tough, early-blooming, medium-sized shrub does well in the urban landscape, but does have some drawbacks. Learn more about forsythia in this article…

Rabbit Ecology and Damage Management

This publication describes the lives, habits, and habitat of the eastern cottontail rabbit and snowshoe hare, both natives of Wisconsin. These creatures consume lots of different kinds of food, including garden vegetables and flowers in spring and summer, and bark of woody plants in fall and winter—which is why they are not welcome guests in everyone’s back yard.

Verticillium Wilt of Trees and Shrubs

Verticillium wilt is a typically fatal disease that affects a wide range of deciduous woody ornamentals in Wisconsin. Trees most commonly and severely affected are maple and ash, but barberry, catalpa, elm, lilac, linden, smoke-tree and redbud are also susceptible. Symptoms and management are covered in this factsheet.

Viburnum Leaf Beetle

The viburnum leaf beetle (VLB), Pyrrhalta viburni, is an invasive insect that feeds exclusively on and can significantly damage Viburnum species. Currently found in limited areas, mostly in southeastern Wisconsin, its spread is being monitored. Identification and control are described in this factsheet.

Phytophthora Root Rot of Christmas Trees

Phytophthora root rot is a common disease of Christmas trees including Douglas-fir, balsam and true firs (e.g., Fraser, balsam and Canaan), spruces, and pines. This fact sheet covers symptoms and management.

Winter Burn

This publication covers winter burn, a common problem of evergreens including those with broad leaves (e.g., boxwood, holly, rhododendron), needles (e.g., fir, hemlock, pine, spruce, yew) and scale-like leaves (e.g., arborvitae, false cypress, juniper) grown in open, unprotected locations and exposed to severe winter conditions.

Woody Ornamentals Pest Management in Wisconsin

Author(s): Chris Williamson, P.J. Liesch, Jim Kerns, Roger Flashinski Woody Ornamentals Pest Management in Wisconsin is an indispensable resource for nursery growers. This completely revised publication identifies pests of trees and shrubs in the state plus the products available for their control. It also notes products that are registered for use by homeowners (56 pages; […]

Shade Trees Disorder: Decline, Dieback, or Early Senescence

Author(s): M.F. Heimann, G.L. Worf “Decline” is a general term that describes the deterioration of a tree’s crown or an overall reduction in vigor. “Dieback” indicates more localized symptoms, with healthy branches adjacent to dead or dying ones. Find out more about tree decline and dieback, how to spot the difference between the two, and […]

Scorch and Related Problems in Trees and Shrubs

Author(s): M.F. Heimann, G.L. Worf Scorch, or the browning of leaf edges, affects a wide range of deciduous and evergreen plants throughout Wisconsin, especially ash, linden, maple, oak, pine, and spruce. While scorch is easily recognizable, it’s important to recognize that it is a symptom, not a cause. A number of problems cause symptoms that […]

Oak Wilt Management—What Are the Options?

Author(s): Jane Cummings Carlson, A. Jeff Martin, Kyoko Scanlon Thousands of oaks in woodland and urban settings die every year from oak wilt, a fungal disease that is widespread in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan. Both the red oak and white oak groups are susceptible, but trees in the red oak group fall prey to the […]

Maple and Other Trees Disorder: Cottony Maple Scale

  Author(s): C.F. Koval, D.L. Mahr, P.J. Pellitteri Cottony maple scale is an insect that can infest the twigs of maples and other shade trees with popcorn-sized cottony masses. These masses produce a considerable amount of sticky liquid that resembles tree sap and eventually turns black due to fungal growth. Infestations are usually more severe […]

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