Rootstocks for Fruit Trees in Wisconsin

Author(s): Teryl R. Roper To grow fruit that is true to type, fruit trees are propagated by budding or grafting sections of known cultivars (scions) onto special rootstocks. This creates fruit trees composed of two parts: a scion (cultivar) and a rootstock. Many nurseries now offer trees with a choice of several rootstocks. In this […]

Plant Growth Regulator Use in Apples

Author(s): Teryl R. Roper Plant growth regulators (PGRs) can be used with some precision for thinning fruit, regulating growth and adjusting harvest periods for apples. These products are absorbed by plant cells, primarily through the leaves and fruit, where they interact with the bio-chemical “machinery” of the plant. They work by mimicking naturally occurring plant […]

Deciduous Tree and Shrub Disorder: Skeletonizing by Rose Chafer

Author(s): R.C. Williamson, C.F. Koval Skeletonizing of the leaves of roses, raspberries, grapes, fruit trees, and many other cultivated trees and shrubs may be caused by the adult rose chafer, Macrodactylus subspinosus (Fabricius). Adult beetles are attracted to flower blossoms, particularly roses and peonies. Damage occurs in June and tends to be most severe in […]

Root-Knot Nematode

Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are small, soilborne, worm-like organisms that infect many agricultural and horticultural plants. This publication describes the symptoms, management and control of root-knot nematodes in Wisconsin.

Foliar Nematodes

Foliar nematodes are microscopic worm-like organisms in the genus Aphelenchoides. They live in and on the leaves (and other above-ground plants parts) of over 450 plant species in more than 75 plant families. They are commonly found on hostas, but can affect other herbaceous ornamentals. Learn what to look for and how to manage foliar nematodes in this factsheet.

Brown Rot

Ashley Ellinghuysen, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  6/22/2013 Item number:  XHT1220 What is brown rot?  Brown rot is a destructive fungal disease of trees and shrubs in the genus Prunus which includes peaches, plum, cherries, apricots and nectarines.  Brown rot is particularly a problem on the fruits of susceptible plants, with the potential to cause losses […]

Controlling Deer Damage in Wisconsin

Scott Craven, Scott Hygnstrom, Philip Peterson Revised:  1/24/2001 Item number:  G3083 Illustrates numerous methods for protecting crops and other property from deer. Offers designs for deer fences and other constructions, along with a list of repellents and scare devices (8 pages). Download Article

Nectria Canker

Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  8/13/2012 Item number:  XHT1094 What is Nectria canker?  Nectria canker is a common and potentially lethal disease that affects many species of trees and shrubs.  This disease can cause significant damage on newly planted, as well as on established, trees and shrubs that are under stress. […]

Southern Blight

Authors: Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Last Revised: 01/03/2019 X-number: XHT1042   What is Southern blight?  Southern blight is a lethal fungal disease that is most common in the tropics and subtropics.  This disease causes damage in the southern U.S. and can even cause problems in temperate locations like Wisconsin during periods of warm, moist […]

Plum Pox

Patricia McManus, UW-Madison Department of Plant Pathology Revised:  5/20/2011 Item number:  XHT1028 What is plum pox? Plum pox, also known as “sharka,” is a virus disease that affects stone fruits including plums, peaches, nectarines, apricots, and ornamental Prunus species.  Cherries are resistant to most strains of plum pox, or at least do not show symptoms.  […]

Crown Gall

Ann Joy and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/5/2005 Item number:  XHT1037 What is a crown gall?  Crown gall is the most widely distributed bacterial disease of plants in the world, affecting over 100 species of fruit crops, and woody and herbaceous ornamentals, including rose, euonymus, lilac, poplar, viburnum, willow, apple, pear, brambles, stone […]

Bird’s Nest Fungi

Amy Gibbs* and Brian Hudelson, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Revised:  5/31/2005 Item number:  XHT1105 What are bird’s nest fungi?  Bird’s nest fungi are a group of organisms named for their resemblance to miniature bird’s nests.  These fungi can be found all over the world, growing and reproducing on decomposing organic matter.  In temperate regions, bird’s nest […]

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