African Fig Fly – Pest Alert

Pest Alert Authors: Janet van Zoeren and Christelle Guédot, UW-Madison Entomology Last Revised: 04/17/2019 X-number: XHT1267 The African fig fly (AFF), Zaprionus indianus, is an invasive vinegar fly closely related to flies in the genus Drosophila [which includes the common vinegar fly (also sometimes called the common fruit fly) and spotted-wing drosophila (SWD)]. AFF is […]

Codling Moth

Codling moth is an insect pest of apple, pear, and walnut crops in Wisconsin. Larval feeding can render fruit unmarketable, potentially causing severe economic loss. Learn how to identify, monitor, and deter this insect pest.

Apple Maggot

Apple maggot, also commonly known as railway worm, is a significant pest of apples in commercial and backyard orchards in most of the United States and eastern Canada. Although predominantly a pest of apples, apple maggot will also infest pears, apricots, peaches, cherries, crabapples, and rose hips. Learn about the life cycle, damage patterns, and control options to effectively manage apple maggot.

Black Stem Borer

Black stem borer (BSB), also known as the alnus ambrosia beetle, is an invasive beetle from Asia that was accidentally introduced into central Europe and North America. BSB has traditionally been considered a serious pest of nursery and landscape trees, but has also been reported as a pest of fruit crops. This factsheet describes the appearance, life cycle, scouting suggestions and control methods of this important pest.

Bagging Apples for Insect and Disease Control

Producing high quality apples in home gardens can be challenging due to damage caused by insects and fungal diseases. Insects and wind-borne fungal spores cause damage when contacting developing fruit. An effective way to produce high-quality fruit organically, without the need for spraying, is placing developing fruit in bags. This factsheet describes the process.

Plum Curculio

Plum curculio, a beetle native to the midwestern United States, is one of the most common and detrimental pests of apple in Wisconsin and can cause significant damage to tree fruit. Along with apple, it attacks pear, quince, and stone fruits such as plum, cherry, peach, and apricot. Learn about the life cycle, damage patterns, and control options to effectively manage plum curculio.

Kiwifruit, Actinidia spp.

What’s brown and fuzzy all over and green inside? Well, the kiwifruit, of course. This Chinese fruit was popularized when it was imported into New Zealand, renamed kiwifruit instead of Chinese gooseberry, and developed as an export crop. Today this fruit crop is grown in many places worldwide, but there is more than just the kind found at the grocery store. To learn more about kiwifruit, read this article…

The Basics of Micro Irrigation

Micro irrigation has numerous advantages over sprinkler irrigation and can be used in greenhouses, orchards, vineyards, fields, lawns, and gardens. Learn about the components that comprise a micro irrigation system along with the benefits (reduced water usage, reduced potential for foliar diseases, reduced energy costs, etc.) and drawbacks these lower pressure systems provide.

Rhubarb, Rheum rhabarbarum

Rhubarb is the first “fruit” of the season – used as a fruit, but grows like a vegetable. With huge leaves on long red to green petioles it can also make a dramatic statement in the garden. This old fashioned perennial is very easy to grow, coming back bigger year after year with little care. To learn more about rhubarb, read this article…

Blueberry Maggot

Blueberry maggot was first detected in Wisconsin in the summer of 2016, and is expected to eventually have a significant impact on blueberry production in Wisconsin. This pest feeds inside blueberry fruit causing it to become soft as it develops. This factsheet describes symptoms, the insect’s lifecycle, monitoring strategies and management methods.

San José Scale

This factsheet describes the symptoms, life cycle, monitoring methods and control of San José scale (Diaspidiotus perniciosus). This fruit tree pest can be found in most fruit growing regions of the United States. In well-managed orchards, populations of San José scale are generally too low to cause economic damage. In poorly managed orchards however, San José scale can get established and be difficult and expensive to control.

Serviceberry, Amelanchier spp.

If you’re looking for a small tree with attractive white blossoms in spring and small fruits that can be food for animals or humans, consider one of several species of serviceberry. There are a number of plants in the genus Amalanchier that are graceful trees or shrubs that can provide year-round ornamental interest in the landscape. To learn more, read this article…

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