African Fig Fly – Pest Alert

Pest Alert Authors: Janet van Zoeren and Christelle Guédot, UW-Madison Entomology Last Revised: 04/17/2019 X-number: XHT1267 The African fig fly (AFF), Zaprionus indianus, is an invasive vinegar fly closely related to flies in the genus Drosophila [which includes the common vinegar fly (also sometimes called the common fruit fly) and spotted-wing drosophila (SWD)]. AFF is […]

Black Stem Borer

Black stem borer (BSB), also known as the alnus ambrosia beetle, is an invasive beetle from Asia that was accidentally introduced into central Europe and North America. BSB has traditionally been considered a serious pest of nursery and landscape trees, but has also been reported as a pest of fruit crops. This factsheet describes the appearance, life cycle, scouting suggestions and control methods of this important pest.

Plum Curculio

Plum curculio, a beetle native to the midwestern United States, is one of the most common and detrimental pests of apple in Wisconsin and can cause significant damage to tree fruit. Along with apple, it attacks pear, quince, and stone fruits such as plum, cherry, peach, and apricot. Learn about the life cycle, damage patterns, and control options to effectively manage plum curculio.

Blueberry Maggot

Blueberry maggot was first detected in Wisconsin in the summer of 2016, and is expected to eventually have a significant impact on blueberry production in Wisconsin. This pest feeds inside blueberry fruit causing it to become soft as it develops. This factsheet describes symptoms, the insect’s lifecycle, monitoring strategies and management methods.

San José Scale

This factsheet describes the symptoms, life cycle, monitoring methods and control of San José scale (Diaspidiotus perniciosus). This fruit tree pest can be found in most fruit growing regions of the United States. In well-managed orchards, populations of San José scale are generally too low to cause economic damage. In poorly managed orchards however, San José scale can get established and be difficult and expensive to control.

Eastern Filbert Blight

Eastern filbert blight is a potentially serious fungal disease found throughout the United States, including Wisconsin. It affects Corylus species, commonly known as hazelnuts or filberts, causing cankers on branches and trunks. Symptoms and management are described in this factsheet.

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) is an invasive planthopper native to China, India, and Vietnam. It was first detected in the U.S. in Pennsylvania in 2014, and due to its highly invasive nature, it appears to be spreading rapidly. SLF has a large host range and potentially could greatly impact the grape, tree fruit, plant nursery and timber industries in the U.S. Learn about what to watch for with this new pest.

Japanese Beetle

The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica, is a significant pest of landscape trees and shrubs, vegetable and fruit crops, and turfgrass in the eastern United States. This factsheet describes the lifecycle of this destructive beetle along with management and control options.

Common leaf spot of Strawberry

Common leaf spot of strawberry is a common fungal leaf disease that affects both wild and cultivated strawberries throughout the world. Once the most economically important strawberry disease, the use of resistant strawberry varieties/cultivars and improvements in growing methods have been effective in managing the disease. Learn about this foliar disease and its potential impact in your strawberry patch.

Cane Blight

David S. Jones*, UW-Madison Plant Pathology Item Number: XHT 1242 Revised:  November 23, 2015 What is cane blight?  Cane blight is a fungal disease that affects the health of canes (i.e., stems) of cultivated and wild Rubus species (e.g., raspberries and blackberries), wherever they are grown.  Black and purple raspberries appear to be more susceptible […]

Rabbit Ecology and Damage Management

This publication describes the lives, habits, and habitat of the eastern cottontail rabbit and snowshoe hare, both natives of Wisconsin. These creatures consume lots of different kinds of food, including garden vegetables and flowers in spring and summer, and bark of woody plants in fall and winter—which is why they are not welcome guests in everyone’s back yard.

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